Amber Robles Gordon

Prizm Panel Presents: The Meaning of Art

In presented In partnership with University of Maryland, College Park David C. Driskell Center Moderated by Professor Curlee R. Holton, Contemporary Artists, Kevin Cole (Atlanta), Rodney Jackson (Miami), Alfred Conteh (Fort Valley, GA), Larry Cook (Baltimore), Tawny Chatmon (Maryland), Amber Robles-Gordon (D.C.), Delita Martin (Texas) explore the following points of inquiry: 1. Who gets to determine the value and significance of a work of art? 2. What role should the artist play in the critical evaluation of a work of art? 3. When has your work been accurately evaluated and interpreted?

Art & Life with Mikhaile Solomon

Art & Life with Mikhaile Solomon

Today we’d like to introduce you to Mikhaile Solomon.

Mikhaile, please kick things off for us by telling us about yourself and your journey so far.
I was born and raised in Miami, Florida and am of Caribbean heritage. My parents are the from the islands of St. Kitts – Nevis. I graduated of Florida International University’s Graduate program in Architecture and completed my undergraduate degree in Theatre Arts at the University of South Florida. With my varied professional experiences comes many years of developmental work in design, education, arts advocacy and community development.

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The Studio Visit presents Amber Robles-Gordon

The Studio Visit presents Amber Robles-Gordon

One of my favorite parts about working with The Studio Visit is the opportunity to get to know artists and learn more about their practice on a more personal, intimate level. I like to spend a little time before we begin a story to have a few one on one visits as well reading as much background information as possible.
Amber and I had this opportunity before we met at her studio on a warm overcast day to film a story about her life, work and process.

Amber Robles-Gordon is a multimedia visual artist with a joyful, positive, happy vibe. Her strikingly colorful work is a powerful fusion of ethnicity, identity, gender and cultural and social interests. Her childhood also informs her work which was filled with a wide range of challenges and the loving, nurturing support of her mother.

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MORE or LESS at Hemphill Fine Arts

MORE or LESS at Hemphill Fine Arts

More or Less: Thoughts on a Comment Made by Walter Hopps

Spring of 1979; only a month after arriving in Washington, Walter Hopps, the revered and now mythical curator, pulled a chair around my desk and sat down beside me. I barely knew Hopps, but I did know enough to see the opportunity in the moment.

So I asked the star curator what he thought was the most important movement in American art. Hopps drew hard on his cigarette, not so much for the need of nicotine, but to give his response the flare of an actor revealing the secret to the plot. His answer: Abstract Expressionism. American art would always tend toward representation, because American art and the American character were bound by a literalness. Therefore Abstract Expressionism would be seen as the most unique and revealing of the American art movements. I cannot say if this was his true belief, or if Hopps was throwing out a response meant to push his inquisitor to think more openly. Nearly 40 years later, the number of artists creating abstract works is not waning.

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art + justice with Amber Robles-Gordon

art + justice with Amber Robles-Gordon

art + justice is a platform for adults to explore the intersection of tactile art-making, thoughtful reflection, and personal enrichment. Through artist-led guided projects audiences unlock their creative potential within themselves, while also enjoying the opportunity to exchange ideas with community towards social justice. art + justice is a hands-on maker space that stimulates creative agency, while providing the mental and emotional space to work through complicated issues around race, gender, identity, and social cohesion.

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At The Altar: From the Fruit of My Love and Labor, Solo Exhibition at Delaware State University

At The Altar: From the Fruit of My Love and Labor, Solo Exhibition at Delaware State University

At the Altar: Fruit of My Love and Labor, represents the process of bringing forth the efforts of my daily thoughts, intentions and actions as best as I can. Then I lay them down at my altar, for myself, for my loved ones, my ancestors and for Spirit. This exhibition is specifically centered on the intersections of creating and using installation art as a form of altar. A personal altar is a dedicated space, designed and erected to celebrate or commemorate something important; an idea, a person, goal or a life intention. These installations are instruments that speak to my personal exploration of loving Spirit, loving myself, my family and specifically my son. 

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